Extinction and the importance of history and dependence in conservation

@article{Catling2001ExtinctionAT,
  title={Extinction and the importance of history and dependence in conservation},
  author={Paul M. Catling},
  journal={Biodiversity},
  year={2001},
  volume={2},
  pages={14 - 2}
}
  • P. Catling
  • Published 1 August 2001
  • Environmental Science
  • Biodiversity
ABSTRACT Many extinct species have had profound effects on other species through their interactions. In themselves, these interactions or functions are an integral part of biodiversity. The influence of species upon others operates in a variety of ways, independently or synchronously, and includes dispersal, habitat creation and maintenance, provision of nutrients or food resources, and reduction in competition from other species. In particular, large and/or abundant vertebrates that are now… 
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