Extensions of the birthday surprise

@article{Klamkin1967ExtensionsOT,
  title={Extensions of the birthday surprise},
  author={Murray S. Klamkin and Donald J. Newman},
  journal={Journal of Combinatorial Theory, Series A},
  year={1967},
  volume={3},
  pages={279-282}
}
  • M. Klamkin, D. Newman
  • Published 1 October 1967
  • Mathematics
  • Journal of Combinatorial Theory, Series A
Abstract The so-called “birthday surprise” is the fact that, on the average, one need only stop about 24 people at random to discover two who have the same birthday. Here we determine, asymptotically, the expected number of people in order for n of them to have the same birthday. In particular, for three birthdays, it is about 83 people. 
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References

The Double Dixie Cup Problem
The familiar childhood occupation of obtaining a complete set of pictures of baseball players, movie stars, etc., which appear on the covers of dixie cups raises some interesting questions. One,