Extending thrombolysis to 4·5–9 h and wake-up stroke using perfusion imaging: a systematic review and meta-analysis of individual patient data

@article{Campbell2019ExtendingTT,
  title={Extending thrombolysis to 4·5–9 h and wake-up stroke using perfusion imaging: a systematic review and meta-analysis of individual patient data},
  author={Bruce C.V. Campbell and Henry Ma and Peter Arthur Ringleb and Mark W. Parsons and Leonid P. Churilov and Martin Bendszus and Christopher R. Levi and Chung Y. Hsu and Timothy J. Kleinig and Marc Fatar and Didier Leys and Carlos A Molina and Tissa Wijeratne and Sami Curtze and Helen M. Dewey and P. Alan Barber and Kenneth Butcher and Deidre A. De Silva and Christopher F Bladin and Nawaf Yassi and Johannes Alex Rolf Pfaff and Gagan Sharma and Andrew Bivard and Patricia M. Desmond and Stefan Schwab and Peter D. Schellinger and Bernard Yan and Peter J. Mitchell and Joaqu{\'i}n Serena and Danilo Toni and Vincent N. Thijs and Werner Hacke and Stephen M. Davis and Geoffrey Alan Donnan and Geoffrey Alan Donnan and Stephen M. Davis and Bruce C.V. Campbell and Mark W. Parsons and Peter J. Mitchell and Patricia M. Desmond and Thomas J. Oxley and Teddy Y. Wu and Darshan G. Shah and Henry Zhao and Edrich Joseph Rodrigues and Patrick Salvaris and Fana Alemseged and Felix C. Ng and Cameron Williams and Jo Lyn Ng and Hans T.H. Tu and Amy Mcdonald and David Jackson and Jess Tsoleridis and Rachael McCoy and Lauren Pesavento and Louise Weir and Timothy J. Kleinig and S. Patel and Jonathan Harvey and Jeyaledchumy Mahadevan and Edmund Cheong and Anna H. Balabanski and Michael Waters and Roy Drew and Jennifer Cranefield and Elizabeth Mackey and Sherisse Celestino and Essie Low and Helen M. Dewey and Christopher F Bladin and Poh-Sien Loh and Philip M.C. Choi and Skye Coote and Tanya Frost and K. Hogan and Cai‐yun Ding and S. McModie and W. W. Zhang and Christopher Kyndt and A. Moore and Zofia Ross and J X Liu and Ferdinand Miteff and Christopher R. Levi and Timothy Ang and Neil James Spratt and Carlos Garcia-Esperon and Lara Kaauwai and Thanh G. Phan and John Ly and Shaloo Singhal and Benjamin Clissold and Kitty T.K. Wong and Martin Krause and Susan Day and Jonathan W. Sturm and Bill O'Brian and Rohan S Grimley and Marion A. Simpson and Matthew Lee-Archer and Amy Brodtmann and Bronwyn Coulton and Dennis Young and Andrew A. Wong and Claire Muller and Deborah Field and Wilson Vallat and Vanessa Maxwell and Peter Bailey and Arman Sabet and Sachin Mishra and M. Tan and K. George and P. Alan Barber and Ling Zhao and Atte Meretoja and Turgut Tatlisumak and Gerli Sibolt and Marjaana Tiainen and Maija Koivu and Karoliina Aarnio and Jeffrey Virta and O. Kasari and S. Eirola and M. C. Sun and T. C. Chen and C. S. Chuang and Y. Y. Chen and C. M. Lin and S. C. Ho and P. M. Hsiao and C. -H. Tsai and W. S. Huang and Y. W. Yang and H. Y. Huang and W. C. Wang and C. H. Liu and M. -K. Lu and C -H Lu and Wei-Ling Kung and S. K. Jiang and Y. H. Wu and S. C. Huang and C. H. Tseng and Linda Tzu-Ling Tseng and Y. C. Guo and Diana Lin and C. T. Hsu and C. W. Kuan and J. P. Hsu and H. T. Tsai and M. Suzuki and Y. Sun and H. F. Chen and C. J. Lu and C. H. Lin and C. C. Huang and H. J. Chu and C. Y. Lee and W. H. Chang and Ying-Chih Lo and Y. T. Hsu and C. H. Chen and Pi-Shan Sung and C. L. Ysai and Jia-Shyun Jeng and S. C. Tang and Li-Kai Tsai and Shin-Joe Yeh and Y. C. Lee and Y. T. Wang and T. C. Chung and C. ‐J. Hu and L. Chan and Y. W. Chiou and L. M. Lien and H. L. Yeh and Jen-Hao Yeh and W. H. Chen and C. L. Lau and Albert Chang and I. Y. Lee and M. Y. Huang and J. T. Lee and Giia Sheun Peng and J. C. Lim and Y. D. Hsu and C. C. Lin and C. A. Cheng and C. H. Yen and F. C. Yang and C. H. Hsu and Yueh-Feng Sung and C. K. Tsai and Cheng-Liang Tsai and A. Lee and Graeme J. Hankey and David J Blacker and Richard Gerraty and C-I. Chen and C-S Hsu and Elise S. Cowley and Michele Sallaberger and Barry Snow and John Kolbe and Richard Stark and John King and Richard Macdonnell and John Attia and Catherine D’Este and Julie Bernhardt and Leeanne M. Carey and Dominique Ann-Michele Cadilhac and Craig S. Anderson and David W. Howells and A. Barber and Alan Connelly and Malcolm Robert Macleod and Victoria E O'Collins and William Wilson and Lance S. Macaulay and Erich Bluhmki and Christoph C. Eschenfelder and Peter Arthur Ringleb and Peter D. Schellinger and Nils Wahlgren and Joanna Marguerite Wardlaw and Catherine Oppenheim and Kennedy R. Lees and Markku Kaste and R{\"u}diger von Kummer and Gilles Chatellier and Rico Laage and Xavier Nu{\~n}ez and Christina Ehrenkrona and Ann-Sofie Svenson and Lynda Cove and Kurt Niederkorn and Franz Gruber and Peter Kapeller and Robert Mikul{\'i}k and Jean Louis Mas and J{\"o}rg Berrouschot and Jan Sobesky and Martin Köhrmann and Thorsten Steiner and Christof Kessler and Rainer Dziewas and Sven Poli and Katharina Althaus-Knaurer and Paolo Bovi and Alain Luna Rodr{\'i}guez and Juan F. Arenillas and Keith W. Muir and Roland C Veltkamp and Anand K. Dixit and Girish Muddegowda and Lalit Kala and Deidre A. De Silva and Kenneth Butcher and G. Byrnes and Andr{\'e} Peeters and Jonathon Chalk and John Newton Fink and Thomas E Kimber and David Schultz and Peter J. Hand and Judith H Frayne and Brian M. Tress and John J. McNeil and R S Burns and C. Johnston and M. Williams},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2019},
  volume={394},
  pages={139-147}
}

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