Expulsion of Live Pathogenic Yeast by Macrophages

@article{Ma2006ExpulsionOL,
  title={Expulsion of Live Pathogenic Yeast by Macrophages},
  author={Hansong Ma and Joanne E. Croudace and David A. Lammas and Robin C. May},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2006},
  volume={16},
  pages={2156-2160}
}
Phagocytic cells, such as neutrophils and macrophages, perform a critical role in protecting organisms from infection by engulfing and destroying invading microbes . Although some bacteria and fungi have evolved strategies to survive within a phagocyte after uptake, most of these pathogens must eventually kill the host cell if they are to escape and infect other tissues . However, we now demonstrate that the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans is able to escape from within macrophages… Expand
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