Exposure to nontraditional pets at home and to animals in public settings: risks to children.

@article{Pickering2008ExposureTN,
  title={Exposure to nontraditional pets at home and to animals in public settings: risks to children.},
  author={Larry K. Pickering and Nina Marano and Joseph A. Bocchini and Frederick J. Angulo},
  journal={Pediatrics},
  year={2008},
  volume={122 4},
  pages={
          876-86
        }
}
Exposure to animals can provide many benefits during the growth and development of children. However, there are potential risks associated with animal exposures, including exposure to nontraditional pets in the home and animals in public settings. Educational materials, regulations, and guidelines have been developed to minimize these risks. Pediatricians, veterinarians, and other health care professionals can provide advice on selection of appropriate pets as well as prevention of disease… Expand

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