Exposure to kynurenic acid during adolescence produces memory deficits in adulthood.

@article{Akagbosu2012ExposureTK,
  title={Exposure to kynurenic acid during adolescence produces memory deficits in adulthood.},
  author={Cynthia O Akagbosu and Gretchen C. Evans and Danielle Gulick and Raymond F. Suckow and David J Bucci},
  journal={Schizophrenia bulletin},
  year={2012},
  volume={38 4},
  pages={769-78}
}
The glia-derived molecule kynurenic acid (KYNA) is an antagonist of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and the glycine(B) binding site on n-methyl-d-aspartateglutamate receptors, both of which have critical roles in neural plasticity as well as learning and memory. KYNA levels are increased in the brains and cerebral spinal fluid of persons with schizophrenia, leading to the notion that changes in KYNA concentration might contribute to cognitive dysfunction associated with this disorder… CONTINUE READING