Explosive Jumping: Extreme Morphological and Physiological Specializations of Australian Rocket Frogs (Litoria nasuta)

@article{James2008ExplosiveJE,
  title={Explosive Jumping: Extreme Morphological and Physiological Specializations of Australian Rocket Frogs (Litoria nasuta)},
  author={R. James and Robbie S. Wilson},
  journal={Physiological and Biochemical Zoology},
  year={2008},
  volume={81},
  pages={176 - 185}
}
Anuran jumping is an ideal system for examining the relationships between key morphological, physiological, and kinematic parameters. We used the Australian rocket frog (Litoria nasuta) as a model species to investigate extreme specialization of the vertebrate locomotor system for jumping. We measured the ground reaction forces applied during maximal jumps using a custom‐designed force platform, which allowed us to calculate instantaneous measures of acceleration, velocity, power output, and… Expand
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