Exploring the influence of ancient and historic megaherbivore extirpations on the global methane budget

@article{Smith2015ExploringTI,
  title={Exploring the influence of ancient and historic megaherbivore extirpations on the global methane budget},
  author={Felisa A. Smith and John I. Hammond and Meghan A Balk and Scott M. Elliott and S. Kathleen Lyons and Melissa I. Pardi and Catalina P. Tom{\'e} and Peter J. Wagner and Marie L. Westover},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
  year={2015},
  volume={113},
  pages={874 - 879}
}
Significance Most large mammals are endangered or vulnerable across the globe. Although the loss of charismatic fauna is of great concern, their role in ecosystem function remains poorly characterized. Here, we quantify one potential effect of the decline of large herbivores: the reduction of the greenhouse gas methane released as a byproduct of plant digestion. We examine three time periods where large-scale losses of megaherbivores occurred—the African rinderpest epizootic of the 1890s, the… 

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