Corpus ID: 17275411

Exploring the Aesthetic Range for Humanoid Robots

@inproceedings{Hanson2006ExploringTA,
  title={Exploring the Aesthetic Range for Humanoid Robots},
  author={D. Hanson},
  year={2006}
}
Although the uncanny exists, the inherent, unavoidable dip (or valley) may be an illusion. Extremely abstract robots can be uncanny if the aesthetic is off, as can cosmetically atypical humans. Thus, the uncanny occupies a continuum ranging from the abstract to the real, although norms of acceptability may narrow as one approaches human likeness. However, if the aesthetic is right, any level of realism or abstraction can be appealing. If so, then avoiding or creating an uncanny effect just… Expand

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