• Corpus ID: 37743711

Exploring older women's lifestyle changes after myocardial infarction.

@article{Crane2003ExploringOW,
  title={Exploring older women's lifestyle changes after myocardial infarction.},
  author={Patricia B. Crane and Jean C. McSweeney},
  journal={Medsurg nursing : official journal of the Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses},
  year={2003},
  volume={12 3},
  pages={
          170-6
        }
}
  • P. Crane, J. McSweeney
  • Published 2003
  • Medicine
  • Medsurg nursing : official journal of the Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses
The researchers explored the failure of older women to attend cardiac rehabilitation after myocardial infarction, and examined facilitating and inhibiting factors in making lifestyle changes. Three global categories emerged: physiological changes, health decisions and actions, and life outcomes of the change process. 
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