Explorations in the social contagion of memory

@article{Meade2002ExplorationsIT,
  title={Explorations in the social contagion of memory},
  author={Michelle L Meade and Henry L. Roediger},
  journal={Memory \& Cognition},
  year={2002},
  volume={30},
  pages={995-1009}
}
Four experiments examined social influence on the development of false memories. We employed the social contagion paradigm: A subject and a confederate see scenes and then later take turns recalling items from the scenes, with the confederate erroneously reporting some items that were not present in the scenes; on a final test, the subject reports these suggested items when instructed to recall only items from the scenes. The first two experiments showed that the social contagion effect… 
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