Exploitation of an ant chemical alarm signal by the zodariid spider Habronestes bradleyi Walckenaer

@article{Allan1996ExploitationOA,
  title={Exploitation of an ant chemical alarm signal by the zodariid spider Habronestes bradleyi Walckenaer},
  author={Rachel A. Allan and Mark A. Elgar and Robert J. Capon},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences},
  year={1996},
  volume={263},
  pages={69 - 73}
}
Intraspecific signals are vulnerable to exploitation by predators that are not the targets of the signal. This cost has been documented for several acoustic, visual and chemical signals, but not for chemical alarm pheromones. We reveal a novel form of exploitation of an ant alarm pheromone by the cursorial spider Habronestes bradleyi (Zodariidae), a specialist predator of the highly territorial and aggressive meat ant Iridomyrmex purpureus. We demonstrate experimentally that H. bradleyi locates… Expand

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