Explaining the uniqueness of the Cape flora: incorporating geomorphic evolution as a factor for explaining its diversification.

@article{Cowling2009ExplainingTU,
  title={Explaining the uniqueness of the Cape flora: incorporating geomorphic evolution as a factor for explaining its diversification.},
  author={Richard M. Cowling and Şerban Procheş and Timothy C. Partridge},
  journal={Molecular phylogenetics and evolution},
  year={2009},
  volume={51 1},
  pages={
          64-74
        }
}
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