Explaining the privacy paradox: A systematic review of literature investigating privacy attitude and behavior

@article{Gerber2018ExplainingTP,
  title={Explaining the privacy paradox: A systematic review of literature investigating privacy attitude and behavior},
  author={Nina Gerber and Paul Gerber and Melanie Volkamer},
  journal={Comput. Secur.},
  year={2018},
  volume={77},
  pages={226-261}
}
Abstract Although survey results show that the privacy of their personal data is an important issue for online users worldwide, most users rarely make an effort to protect this data actively and often even give it away voluntarily. Privacy researchers have made several attempts to explain this dichotomy between privacy attitude and behavior, usually referred to as ‘privacy paradox’. While they proposed different theoretical explanations for the privacy paradox, as well as empirical study… 
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