Explaining the birthright citizenship lottery: Longitudinal and cross‐national evidence for key determinants

@article{Solodoch2018ExplainingTB,
  title={Explaining the birthright citizenship lottery: Longitudinal and cross‐national evidence for key determinants},
  author={Omer Solodoch and Udi Sommer},
  journal={Regulation \& Governance},
  year={2018}
}
In the modern nation-state, birthright citizenship laws — jus soli and jus sanguinis — are the two main gateways to sociopolitical membership. The vast majority of the world’s population (97%) obtain their citizenship as a matter of birthright. Yet because comparative research has been focused on measuring and explaining the multiple components of citizenship and immigration policies, a systematic analysis of birthright citizenship is lacking. We bridge this gap by analyzing the birthright… 
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