Explaining the Deterrence Effect of Human Rights Prosecutions for Transitional Countries

@article{Kim2010ExplainingTD,
  title={Explaining the Deterrence Effect of Human Rights Prosecutions for Transitional Countries},
  author={Hun Joon Kim and Kathryn Sikkink},
  journal={International Studies Quarterly},
  year={2010},
  volume={54},
  pages={939-963}
}
Human rights prosecutions have been the major policy innovation of the late twentieth century designed to address human rights violations. The main justification for such prosecutions is that sanctions are necessary to deter future violations. In this article, we use our new data set on domestic and international human rights prosecutions in 100 transitional countries to explore whether prosecuting human rights violations can decrease repression. We find that human rights prosecutions after… 

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