Explaining the Decline in the U.S. Employment-to-Population Ratio: A Review of the Evidence

@article{Abraham2018ExplainingTD,
  title={Explaining the Decline in the U.S. Employment-to-Population Ratio: A Review of the Evidence},
  author={Katharine G. Abraham and Melissa S. Kearney},
  journal={NBER Working Paper Series},
  year={2018}
}
This paper first documents trends in employment rates and then reviews what is known about the various factors that have been proposed to explain the decline in the overall employment-to-population ratio between 1999 and 2018. Population aging has had a large effect on the overall employment rate over this period, but within-age-group declines in employment among young and prime age adults also have played a central role. Among the factors whose effects the evidence allows us to quantify, labor… Expand
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