Explaining Wars Fought by Established Democracies: Do Institutional Constraints Matter?

@article{Leblang2003ExplainingWF,
  title={Explaining Wars Fought by Established Democracies: Do Institutional Constraints Matter?},
  author={David Leblang and Steve Kwok-Leung Chan},
  journal={Political Research Quarterly},
  year={2003},
  volume={56},
  pages={385 - 400}
}
Extant research has shown that cross-national variations in the level of a country ’s democracy tend to be related to its propensity to be involved in external conflict. The dyadic version of the theory of democratic peace contends that democracies rarely, if ever, fight each other, and it is strongly supported by the available evidence. The monadic version, suggesting that democracies are in general more peaceful regardless of the nature of the other party involved in a relationship, has been… 

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  • R. Stein
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