Expertise-related deactivation of the right temporoparietal junction during musical improvisation

@article{Berkowitz2010ExpertiserelatedDO,
  title={Expertise-related deactivation of the right temporoparietal junction during musical improvisation},
  author={Aaron L. Berkowitz and Daniel Ansari},
  journal={NeuroImage},
  year={2010},
  volume={49},
  pages={712-719}
}

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