Expert consensus: time for a change in the way we advise our patients to use topical corticosteroids

@article{Bewley2008ExpertCT,
  title={Expert consensus: time for a change in the way we advise our patients to use topical corticosteroids},
  author={Anthony Bewley},
  journal={British Journal of Dermatology},
  year={2008},
  volume={158}
}
  • A. Bewley
  • Published 1 May 2008
  • Medicine
  • British Journal of Dermatology
Topical corticosteroids form the mainstay of treatment for many skin conditions. If used appropriately, they are safe and effective, and side‐effects are generally uncommon. Current advice to patients to apply topical corticosteroid preparations ‘sparingly’ or ‘thinly’ contributes to ‘steroid phobia’, increasing the risk of poor clinical response and treatment failure. Such cautionary advice also overlooks the fact that the vast majority of patients are prescribed topical corticosteroids of… 
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TLDR
The need for provision of better information and education to patients and possibly general practitioners regarding the safety, potency and appropriate use of topical corticosteroids is highlighted.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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