Experimental quantum cryptography

@article{Bennett1991ExperimentalQC,
  title={Experimental quantum cryptography},
  author={Charles H. Bennett and François Bessette and Gilles Brassard and Louis Salvail and John A. Smolin},
  journal={Journal of Cryptology},
  year={1991},
  volume={5},
  pages={3-28}
}
We describe results from an apparatus and protocol designed to implement quantum key distribution, by which two users, who share no secret information initially: (1) exchange a random quantum transmission, consisting of very faint flashes of polarized light; (2) by subsequent public discussion of the sent and received versions of this transmission estimate the extent of eavesdropping that might have taken place on it, and finally (3) if this estimate is small enough, distill from the sent and… 

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