Experimental infection of the baboon (Papio cynocephalus) with Echinococcus granulosus of camel, cattle, sheep and goat origin from Kenya.

Abstract

In different areas of the world, strains of Echinococcus granulosus have been described which appear to vary in their infectivity, and laboratory primates have been used as indicators of their infectivity to man. This phenomenon was evaluated in Kenya for hydatid material of human, camel, cattle, sheep and goat origin. Viable eggs, produced by experimental infections in dogs with larval material from all the above intermediate hosts, were fed separately to four baboons (Papio cynocephalus) in each case. Baboons were autopsied between 373 and 501 days following infection and the liver, lungs, heart, spleen and kidneys were thoroughly inspected. Hydatid cysts were recovered from two baboons in each of the camel, sheep and goat groups, three baboons in the cattle group and none of the baboons in the human group. Fertile cysts were found in the cattle and goat groups and it is suggested that the baboon could be used as an experimental model for this parasite.

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@article{Macpherson1986ExperimentalIO, title={Experimental infection of the baboon (Papio cynocephalus) with Echinococcus granulosus of camel, cattle, sheep and goat origin from Kenya.}, author={Calum N. L. Macpherson and Jane E. Else and Mbaruk Abdalla Suleman}, journal={Journal of helminthology}, year={1986}, volume={60 3}, pages={213-7} }