Experimental evidence for superionic water ice using shock compression

@article{Millot2018ExperimentalEF,
  title={Experimental evidence for superionic water ice using shock compression},
  author={Marius Millot and Sebastien Hamel and J Ryan Rygg and Peter M. Celliers and Gilbert W. Collins and F. Coppari and Dayne E Fratanduono and Raymond Jeanloz and Damian C. Swift and Jon H. Eggert},
  journal={Nature Physics},
  year={2018},
  volume={14},
  pages={297-302}
}
In stark contrast to common ice, Ih, water ice at planetary interior conditions has been predicted to become superionic with fast-diffusing (that is, liquid-like) hydrogen ions moving within a solid lattice of oxygen. Likely to constitute a large fraction of icy giant planets, this extraordinary phase has not been observed in the laboratory. Here, we report laser-driven shock-compression experiments on water ice VII. Using time-resolved optical pyrometry and laser velocimetry measurements as… 

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