Experimental demonstration of a parasite-induced immune response in wild birds: Darwin's finches and introduced nest flies

@article{Koop2013ExperimentalDO,
  title={Experimental demonstration of a parasite-induced immune response in wild birds: Darwin's finches and introduced nest flies},
  author={J. A. Koop and J. Owen and Sarah A. Knutie and M. Aguilar and D. Clayton},
  journal={Ecology and Evolution},
  year={2013},
  volume={3},
  pages={2514 - 2523}
}
Abstract Ecological immunology aims to explain variation among hosts in the strength and efficacy of immunological defenses. However, a shortcoming has been the failure to link host immune responses to actual parasites under natural conditions. Here, we present one of the first experimental demonstrations of a parasite-induced immune response in a wild bird population. The recently introduced ectoparasitic nest fly Philornis downsi severely impacts the fitness of Darwin's finches and other land… Expand
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