Experimental adaptation of an influenza H5 haemagglutinin (HA) confers respiratory droplet transmission to a reassortant H5 HA/H1N1 virus in ferrets

@article{Imai2012ExperimentalAO,
  title={Experimental adaptation of an influenza H5 haemagglutinin (HA) confers respiratory droplet transmission to a reassortant H5 HA/H1N1 virus in ferrets},
  author={Masaki Imai and Tokiko Watanabe and Masato Hatta and Subash Chandra Das and Makoto Ozawa and Kyoko Shinya and Gongxun Zhong and Anthony Hanson and Hiroaki Katsura and Shinji Watanabe and Chengjun Li and Eiryo Kawakami and Shinya Yamada and Maki Kiso and Yasuo Suzuki and Eileen A. Maher and Gabriele Neumann and Yoshihiro Kawaoka},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2012},
  volume={486},
  pages={420 - 428}
}
Highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza A viruses occasionally infect humans, but currently do not transmit efficiently among humans. The viral haemagglutinin (HA) protein is a known host-range determinant as it mediates virus binding to host-specific cellular receptors. Here we assess the molecular changes in HA that would allow a virus possessing subtype H5 HA to be transmissible among mammals. We identified a reassortant H5 HA/H1N1 virus—comprising H5 HA (from an H5N1 virus) with four… Expand
Human antibodies that neutralize respiratory droplet transmissible H5N1 influenza viruses.
TLDR
A combination of structural techniques and immunological techniques were used to define a mechanism of antibody recognition of an H5 HA receptor-binding site that neutralized H5N1 influenza viruses and pseudoviruses carrying the HA rdt variants that have mutations near the receptor- binding site. Expand
Reassortment between Avian H5N1 and Human Influenza Viruses Is Mainly Restricted to the Matrix and Neuraminidase Gene Segments
TLDR
In ferrets, inoculation with a mixture of H5N1-pandemic H1N1 reassortant viruses resulted in outgrowth of reassORTant H5 viruses that had incorporated the neuraminidase and matrix gene segment of pandemic 2009 H1n1, and this virus was not transmitted via aerosols or respiratory droplets to naïve recipient ferrets. Expand
Selection on haemagglutinin imposes a bottleneck during mammalian transmission of reassortant H 5 N 1 influenza viruses
The emergence of human-transmissible H5N1 avian influenza viruses poses a major pandemic threat. H5N1 viruses are thought to be highly genetically diverse both among and within hosts; however, theExpand
Virology: Bird flu in mammals
An engineered influenza virus based on a haemagglutinin protein from H5N1 avian influenza, with just four mutations, can be transmitted between ferrets, emphasizing the potential for a human pandemicExpand
H1N1 influenza viruses varying widely in hemagglutinin stability transmit efficiently from swine to swine and to ferrets
TLDR
Overall, it is found swine support a broad range of HA activation pH for contact transmission and many recent swine H1N1 and H3N2 isolates have stabilized (human-like) HA proteins, which constitutes a heightened pandemic risk and underscores the importance of ongoing surveillance and control efforts for swine viruses. Expand
H5N1 Hybrid Viruses Bearing 2009/H1N1 Virus Genes Transmit in Guinea Pigs by Respiratory Droplet
TLDR
Transmission studies showed that the H1N1 virus genes encoding acidic polymerase and nonstructural protein made the H5N1irus transmissible by respiratory droplet between guinea pigs without killing them, suggesting that avian H5n1 subtype viruses do have the potential to acquire mammalian transmissibility by reassortment in current agricultural scenarios. Expand
Pathogenicity and transmission of a swine influenza A(H6N6) virus
TLDR
Findings suggest H6N6 swine IAV (SIV) currently poses a moderate risk to public health, but its evolution and spread should be closely monitored. Expand
Airborne Transmission of Influenza A/H5N1 Virus Between Ferrets
TLDR
Avian A/H5N1 influenza viruses can acquire the capacity for airborne transmission between mammals without recombination in an intermediate host and therefore constitute a risk for human pandemic influenza. Expand
Mutations Driving Airborne Transmission of A/H5N1 Virus in Mammals Cause Substantial Attenuation in Chickens only when combined
TLDR
It is indicated that an A/H5N1 virus that is airborne-transmissible between mammals is unlikely to emerge in chickens, although individual mammalian adaptive substitutions have limited impact on viral fitness in chickens. Expand
A Highly Pathogenic Avian H7N9 Influenza Virus Isolated from A Human Is Lethal in Some Ferrets Infected via Respiratory Droplets.
TLDR
The results suggest that the highly pathogenic H7N9 virus has pandemic potential and should be closely monitored. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 111 REFERENCES
Lack of transmission of H5N1 avian–human reassortant influenza viruses in a ferret model
TLDR
It is suggested that H5N1 viruses may require further adaptation to acquire this essential pandemic trait, and the complexity of the genetic basis of influenza virus transmissibility is highlighted. Expand
Increased Pathogenicity of a Reassortant 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Virus Containing an H5N1 Hemagglutinin
TLDR
Reassortment between cocirculating human pH1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza strains will result in a virus with the potential for increased pathogenicity in mammals, suggesting that these viruses easily adapt to humans and become more virulent. Expand
Reassortment between Avian H5N1 and Human H3N2 Influenza Viruses in Ferrets: a Public Health Risk Assessment
TLDR
It is reasonable to conclude that continued exposure of humans and animals to H5N1 alongside seasonal influenza viruses increases the risk of generating H5 subtype reassortant viruses that may be shed from upper airway secretions. Expand
In vitro evolution of H5N1 avian influenza virus toward human-type receptor specificity.
TLDR
The complex changes required for airborne transmissability in ferrets suggest that extensive evolution is needed for H5N1 transmissibility in humans. Expand
Haemagglutinin mutations responsible for the binding of H5N1 influenza A viruses to human-type receptors
TLDR
It is shown that some H5N1 viruses isolated from humans can bind to both human and avian receptors, in contrast to those isolated from chickens and ducks, which recognize the avian receptor exclusively. Expand
Single HA2 Mutation Increases the Infectivity and Immunogenicity of a Live Attenuated H5N1 Intranasal Influenza Vaccine Candidate Lacking NS1
TLDR
The finding suggests that an efficient intranasal vaccination with a live attenuated H5N1 virus may require a certain level of pH and temperature stability of HA in order to achieve an optimal virus uptake by the nasal epithelial cells and induce a sufficient immune response. Expand
Identification of Amino Acids in HA and PB2 Critical for the Transmission of H5N1 Avian Influenza Viruses in a Mammalian Host
TLDR
The authors' mutagenesis analysis revealed that the amino acid asparagine at position 701 in the PB2 protein was a prerequisite for DKGX/35 transmission in guinea pigs, and an amino acid change in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein was responsible for HA binding to sialylated glycans and was critical for H5N1 virus transmission in Guinea pigs. Expand
Inefficient Transmission of H5N1 Influenza Viruses in a Ferret Contact Model
TLDR
The results suggest that despite their receptor binding affinity, circulating H5N1 viruses retain molecular determinants that restrict their spread among mammalian species. Expand
Acquisition of Human-Type Receptor Binding Specificity by New H5N1 Influenza Virus Sublineages during Their Emergence in Birds in Egypt
TLDR
The findings suggested that emergence of new H5 sublineages with α2,6 SA specificity caused a subsequent increase in human H5N1 influenza virus infections in Egypt, and provided data for understanding the virus's pandemic potential. Expand
Recent avian H5N1 viruses exhibit increased propensity for acquiring human receptor specificity.
TLDR
Widespread occurrence of these susceptible H5N1 clade 2.2 influenza strains should be considered high-risk, because of their significantly lower threshold for acquiring human receptor specificity and, therefore, warrant increased surveillance and further study. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...