Experimental Studies of Group Selection: What Do They Tell US About Group Selection in Nature?

@article{Goodnight1997ExperimentalSO,
  title={Experimental Studies of Group Selection: What Do They Tell US About Group Selection in Nature?},
  author={Charles J. Goodnight and Lori Stevens},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={1997},
  volume={150},
  pages={s59 - s79}
}
The study of group selection has developed along two autonomous lines. One approach, which we refer to as the adaptationist school, seeks to understand the evolution of existing traits by examining plausible mechanisms for their evolution and persistence. The other approach, which we refer to as the genetic school, seeks to examine how currently acting artificial or natural selection changes traits within populations and focuses on current evolutionary change. The levels of selection debate… 
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