Experimental Protocols Alter Phototransduction: The Implications for Retinal Processing at Visual Threshold

@article{Azevedo2011ExperimentalPA,
  title={Experimental Protocols Alter Phototransduction: The Implications for Retinal Processing at Visual Threshold},
  author={Anthony W. Azevedo and Fred Rieke},
  journal={The Journal of Neuroscience},
  year={2011},
  volume={31},
  pages={3670 - 3682}
}
Vision in dim light, when photons are scarce, requires reliable signaling of the arrival of single photons. Rod photoreceptors accomplish this task through the use of a G-protein-coupled transduction cascade that amplifies the activity of single active rhodopsin molecules. This process is one of the best understood signaling cascades in biology, yet quantitative measurements of the amplitude and kinetics of the rod's response in mice vary by a factor of ∼2 across studies. What accounts for… 
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