Experimental Evidence for Synchronization to a Musical Beat in a Nonhuman Animal

@article{Patel2009ExperimentalEF,
  title={Experimental Evidence for Synchronization to a Musical Beat in a Nonhuman Animal},
  author={Aniruddh D. Patel and John Rehner Iversen and Micah R. Bregman and Irena Schulz},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2009},
  volume={19},
  pages={827-830}
}
The tendency to move in rhythmic synchrony with a musical beat (e.g., via head bobbing, foot tapping, or dance) is a human universal [1] yet is not commonly observed in other species [2]. Does this ability reflect a brain specialization for music cognition, or does it build on neural circuitry that ordinarily serves other functions? According to the "vocal learning and rhythmic synchronization" hypothesis [3], entrainment to a musical beat relies on the neural circuitry for complex vocal… 

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