Experimental Evidence for Spatial Self-Organization and Its Emergent Effects in Mussel Bed Ecosystems

@article{vandeKoppel2008ExperimentalEF,
  title={Experimental Evidence for Spatial Self-Organization and Its Emergent Effects in Mussel Bed Ecosystems},
  author={Johan van de Koppel and Joanna C. Gascoigne and Guy Theraulaz and Max Rietkerk and Wolf M. Mooij and Peter M. J. Herman},
  journal={Science},
  year={2008},
  volume={322},
  pages={739 - 742}
}
Spatial self-organization is the main theoretical explanation for the global occurrence of regular or otherwise coherent spatial patterns in ecosystems. Using mussel beds as a model ecosystem, we provide an experimental demonstration of spatial self-organization. Under homogeneous laboratory conditions, mussels developed regular patterns, similar to those in the field. An individual-based model derived from our experiments showed that interactions between individuals explained the observed… Expand

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