Experiencing Oneself vs Another Person as Being the Cause of an Action: The Neural Correlates of the Experience of Agency

@article{Farrer2002ExperiencingOV,
  title={Experiencing Oneself vs Another Person as Being the Cause of an Action: The Neural Correlates of the Experience of Agency},
  author={C. Farrer and C. Frith},
  journal={NeuroImage},
  year={2002},
  volume={15},
  pages={596-603}
}
  • C. Farrer, C. Frith
  • Published 2002
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • NeuroImage
  • The present study is aimed at identifying the neural correlates of two kinds of attribution: experiencing oneself as the cause of an action (the sense of agency) or experiencing another person as being the cause of that action. The experimental conditions were chosen so that they differed only in their requirement to attribute an action to another person or to oneself. The same motor task and the same visual stimuli were used in the experimental conditions. Subjects used a joystick to drive a… CONTINUE READING

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