Experiences of hearing voices: analysis of a novel phenomenological survey

@article{Woods2015ExperiencesOH,
  title={Experiences of hearing voices: analysis of a novel phenomenological survey},
  author={Angela Woods and Nev Jones and Ben Alderson-Day and Felicity Callard and Charles Fernyhough},
  journal={The Lancet. Psychiatry},
  year={2015},
  volume={2},
  pages={323 - 331}
}

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