Experiences of discrimination and positive treatment in people with mental health problems: Findings from an Australian national survey

@article{Reavley2015ExperiencesOD,
  title={Experiences of discrimination and positive treatment in people with mental health problems: Findings from an Australian national survey},
  author={Nicola Jane Reavley and Anthony F Jorm},
  journal={Australian \& New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry},
  year={2015},
  volume={49},
  pages={906 - 913}
}
  • N. Reavley, Anthony F Jorm
  • Published 26 August 2015
  • Medicine, Psychology, Political Science
  • Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
Objective: Stigma and discrimination are central concerns for people with mental health problems. The aim of the study was to carry out a national survey in order to assess experiences of avoidance, discrimination and positive treatment in people with mental health problems. Methods: In 2014, telephone interviews were carried out with 5220 Australians aged 18+, 1381 of whom reported a mental health problem or scored highly on a symptom screening questionnaire. Questions covered experiences of… 
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