Experience with breast cancer, pre‐screening perceived susceptibility and the psychological impact of screening

@article{Absetz2003ExperienceWB,
  title={Experience with breast cancer, pre‐screening perceived susceptibility and the psychological impact of screening},
  author={Pilvikki Absetz and Arja R. Aro and Stephen Sutton},
  journal={Psycho‐Oncology},
  year={2003},
  volume={12}
}
This prospective study examined whether the psychological impact of organized mammography screening is influenced by women's pre‐existing experience with breast cancer and perceived susceptibility (PS) to the disease. From a target population of 16,886, a random sample of women with a normal screening finding and all women with a false positive or a benign biopsy finding were included (N=1942). Data were collected with postal questionnaires 1‐month before screening invitation and 2 and 12… Expand
What is the psychological impact of mammographic screening on younger women with a family history of breast cancer? Findings from a prospective cohort study by the PIMMS Management Group.
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  • Medicine
  • Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • 2007
TLDR
For women receiving an immediate all-clear result, participating in annual mammographic screening is psychologically beneficial: these women's positive views about mammography suggest that they view any distress caused by recall as an acceptable part of screening. Expand
The psychological impact of mammographic screening on women with a family history of breast cancer—a systematic review
TLDR
Overall, the findings indicate that, similar to women in the general population, most women with a family history do not appear to experience high levels of anxiety associated with mammographic screening, and although women who are recalled for further tests do experience increased anxiety, the levels appear to be no greater than for women without aFamily history. Expand
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The psychological impact of mammographic screening. A systematic review
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It was found that women with negative results after mammography screening experience minor negative psychological consequences, and some women have even measured less anxiety following mammography than before because of the reassurance given by a clear negative result. Expand
Psychological characteristics and subjective symptoms as determinants of psychological distress in patients prior to breast cancer diagnosis
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Risk Perceptions Among Participants Undergoing Lung Cancer Screening: Baseline Results from the National Lung Screening Trial
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  • Medicine
  • Annals of behavioral medicine : a publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine
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TLDR
Using a comprehensive risk perception measurement, National Lung Screening Trial participants' perceptions of risk for lung cancer and other smoking-related diseases are examined to find that current and former smokers held different risk perceptions. Expand
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