Experience shapes the susceptibility of a reef coral to bleaching

@article{Brown2002ExperienceST,
  title={Experience shapes the susceptibility of a reef coral to bleaching},
  author={Barbara E. Brown and Richard P Dunne and Michael S Goodson and A. E. Douglas},
  journal={Coral Reefs},
  year={2002},
  volume={21},
  pages={119-126}
}
Abstract. Individual zooxanthellate corals vary in their susceptibility to bleaching, caused by the loss of symbiotic algae in response to increased temperatures and solar radiation. In 1995 at Phuket, Thailand, the west face of colonies of the massive coral Goniastrea aspera displayed bleaching in January–March, mediated by high solar radiation. By May, when sea temperatures were anomalously high but solar radiation much reduced, the east sides preferentially bleached. Cores from the east… 
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