Experience sampling during fMRI reveals default network and executive system contributions to mind wandering

@article{Christoff2009ExperienceSD,
  title={Experience sampling during fMRI reveals default network and executive system contributions to mind wandering},
  author={Kalina Christoff and Alan M. Gordon and Jonathan Smallwood and Rachelle Smith and Jonathan W. Schooler},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
  year={2009},
  volume={106},
  pages={8719 - 8724}
}
Although mind wandering occupies a large proportion of our waking life, its neural basis and relation to ongoing behavior remain controversial. We report an fMRI study that used experience sampling to provide an online measure of mind wandering during a concurrent task. Analyses focused on the interval of time immediately preceding experience sampling probes demonstrate activation of default network regions during mind wandering, a finding consistent with theoretical accounts of default network… Expand

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