Expelling frogs and binding babies: conception, gestation and birth in nineteenth-century African-American midwifery

@article{Wilkie2013ExpellingFA,
  title={Expelling frogs and binding babies: conception, gestation and birth in nineteenth-century African-American midwifery},
  author={Laurie A. Wilkie},
  journal={World Archaeology},
  year={2013},
  volume={45},
  pages={272 - 284}
}
  • L. Wilkie
  • Published 1 June 2013
  • History
  • World Archaeology
That pregnancy can be perceived as a blessed or cursed event is well-recognised in many contemporary societies, but it was a lived and embodied experience for African-American women in the Deep South of the United States in the 19th century. Oral histories from healers, root doctors and midwives of the late 19th and early 20th centuries paint a portrait of the fetus as an invasive spiritual malignancy to be driven from the body, or an ephemeral spirit that could be accidently frightened from an… 
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