Expanding habitat of the imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta): a public health concern.

@article{Kemp2000ExpandingHO,
  title={Expanding habitat of the imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta): a public health concern.},
  author={Stephen F. Kemp and Richard D. deShazo and John E. Moffitt and D. F. Williams and W A Buhner},
  journal={The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology},
  year={2000},
  volume={105 4},
  pages={
          683-91
        }
}
Residents in the southeastern United States would hardly describe life with the aggressive imported fire ant as peaceful coexistence. The continued spread of these insects has produced agricultural problems, changes in the ecosystem, and increasing numbers of subjects with sting sequelae, including hypersensitivity reactions, secondary infections, and rare neurologic sequelae. Evolutionary changes have facilitated their expansion northward into Virginia and westward into California, and… Expand
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TLDR
Two recent evolutionary changes in the ants may make the expansion of their geographical range more likely and result in increasing numbers of persons with hypersensitivity reactions, secondary infections, and neurologic sequelae. Expand
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Physicians should become familiar with the biology of these insects to assist patients in dealing with this problem and report two cases where individuals were stung indoors by imported fire ants. Expand
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TLDR
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