Exertional compartment syndrome and the role of magnetic resonance imaging.

@article{Lauder2002ExertionalCS,
  title={Exertional compartment syndrome and the role of magnetic resonance imaging.},
  author={Tamara D. Lauder and Michael James Stuart and Kimberly K. Amrami and Joel P. Felmlee},
  journal={American journal of physical medicine & rehabilitation},
  year={2002},
  volume={81 4},
  pages={315-9}
}
A 47-yr-old woman presented with a 1-yr history of progressive bilateral anterior lower leg pain and swelling with walking, which resolved 10 min after activity. Postexercise (forced dorsiflexion) magnetic resonance imaging revealed increased T2 signal intensity in the entire anterior muscle compartment, and anterior compartment pressures were elevated at rest and postexercise. Chronic exertional compartment syndrome can occur in some patients after even minimal physical activities, and… CONTINUE READING