Exercise is medicine in oncology: Engaging clinicians to help patients move through cancer

@article{Schmitz2019ExerciseIM,
  title={Exercise is medicine in oncology: Engaging clinicians to help patients move through cancer},
  author={Katherine H Schmitz and Anna M Campbell and Martijn M Stuiver and Bernardine M Pinto and Anna L Schwartz and G. Stephen Morris and Jennifer A. Ligibel and Andrea L. Cheville and Daniel A. Galv{\~a}o and Catherine M Alfano and Alpa V Patel and Trisha F. Hue and Lynn H. Gerber and Robert Sallis and Niraj J. Gusani and Nicole L. Stout and Leighton Chan and Fiona Flowers and Colleen M Doyle and Susan P. Helmrich and William James Bain and Jonas M. Sokolof and Kerri M. Winters-Stone and Kristin L. Campbell and Charles E. Matthews},
  journal={CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians},
  year={2019},
  volume={69}
}
Multiple organizations around the world have issued evidence‐based exercise guidance for patients with cancer and cancer survivors. Recently, the American College of Sports Medicine has updated its exercise guidance for cancer prevention as well as for the prevention and treatment of a variety of cancer health‐related outcomes (eg, fatigue, anxiety, depression, function, and quality of life). Despite these guidelines, the majority of people living with and beyond cancer are not regularly… 
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