Exercise improves executive function and achievement and alters brain activation in overweight children: a randomized, controlled trial.

@article{Davis2011ExerciseIE,
  title={Exercise improves executive function and achievement and alters brain activation in overweight children: a randomized, controlled trial.},
  author={Catherine L. Davis and Phillip D. Tomporowski and Jennifer E. McDowell and Benjamin Piya Austin and Patricia H. Miller and Nathan Yanasak and Jerry David Allison and Jack A. Naglieri},
  journal={Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association},
  year={2011},
  volume={30 1},
  pages={
          91-8
        }
}
  • C. Davis, P. Tomporowski, J. Naglieri
  • Published 2011
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association
OBJECTIVE This experiment tested the hypothesis that exercise would improve executive function. DESIGN Sedentary, overweight 7- to 11-year-old children (N = 171, 56% girls, 61% Black, M ± SD age = 9.3 ± 1.0 years, body mass index [BMI] = 26 ± 4.6 kg/m², BMI z-score = 2.1 ± 0.4) were randomized to 13 ± 1.6 weeks of an exercise program (20 or 40 min/day), or a control condition. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Blinded, standardized psychological evaluations (Cognitive Assessment System and Woodcock… 

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