Exercise, Learned Helplessness, and the Stress-Resistant Brain

@article{Greenwood2008ExerciseLH,
  title={Exercise, Learned Helplessness, and the Stress-Resistant Brain},
  author={Benjamin N. Greenwood and Monika Fleshner},
  journal={NeuroMolecular Medicine},
  year={2008},
  volume={10},
  pages={81-98}
}
Exercise can prevent the development of stress-related mood disorders, such as depression and anxiety. The underlying neurobiological mechanisms of this effect, however, remain unknown. Recently, researchers have used animal models to begin to elucidate the potential mechanisms underlying the protective effects of physical activity. Using the behavioral consequences of uncontrollable stress or “learned helplessness” as an animal analog of depression- and anxiety-like behaviors in rats, we are… Expand
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Voluntary exercise and depression-like behavior in rodents : are we running in the right direction ?
Acute or chronic exposure to stress can increase the risk to develop major depressive disorder, a severe, recurrent and common psychiatric condition. Depression places an enormous social andExpand
Voluntary exercise and depression-like behavior in rodents : are we running in the right direction ?
Acute or chronic exposure to stress can increase the risk to develop major depressive disorder, a severe, recurrent and common psychiatric condition. Depression places an enormous social andExpand
Voluntary exercise and depression-like behavior in rodents : are we running in the right direction ?
Acute or chronic exposure to stress can increase the risk to develop major depressive disorder, a severe, recurrent and common psychiatric condition. Depression places an enormous social andExpand
Voluntary exercise and depression-like behavior in rodents : are we running in the right direction ?
Acute or chronic exposure to stress can increase the risk to develop major depressive disorder, a severe, recurrent and common psychiatric condition. Depression places an enormous social andExpand
Voluntary exercise and depression-like behavior in rodents : are we running in the right direction ?
Acute or chronic exposure to stress can increase the risk to develop major depressive disorder, a severe, recurrent and common psychiatric condition. Depression places an enormous social andExpand
Voluntary exercise and depression-like behavior in rodents : are we running in the right direction ?
Acute or chronic exposure to stress can increase the risk to develop major depressive disorder, a severe, recurrent and common psychiatric condition. Depression places an enormous social andExpand
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