Excretion of Antimicrobials Used to Treat Methicillin‐Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections During Lactation: Safety in Breastfeeding Infants

@article{Mitrano2009ExcretionOA,
  title={Excretion of Antimicrobials Used to Treat Methicillin‐Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections During Lactation: Safety in Breastfeeding Infants},
  author={Jennifer A Mitrano and Linda M. Spooner and Paul Belliveau},
  journal={Pharmacotherapy: The Journal of Human Pharmacology and Drug Therapy},
  year={2009},
  volume={29}
}
Community‐acquired strains of methicillin‐resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA) have become a common cause of skin and soft tissue infections in the United States. These infections sometimes require treatment with antibiotics, and with the increasing resistance of pathogens to these agents, choosing the appropriate drug can be difficult. In lactating women who develop these infections, selecting an antibiotic is even more challenging, as clinicians need to be aware of risks to the infant from… Expand
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