Exceptionally preserved juvenile megalosauroid theropod dinosaur with filamentous integument from the Late Jurassic of Germany

@article{Rauhut2012ExceptionallyPJ,
  title={Exceptionally preserved juvenile megalosauroid theropod dinosaur with filamentous integument from the Late Jurassic of Germany},
  author={Oliver W. M. Rauhut and Christian Foth and Helmut Tischlinger and Mark A. Norell},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
  year={2012},
  volume={109},
  pages={11746 - 11751}
}
  • O. Rauhut, C. Foth, M. Norell
  • Published 2 July 2012
  • Geography, Environmental Science
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Recent discoveries in Asia have greatly increased our understanding of the evolution of dinosaurs’ integumentary structures, revealing a previously unexpected diversity of “protofeathers” and feathers. However, all theropod dinosaurs with preserved feathers reported so far are coelurosaurs. Evidence for filaments or feathers in noncoelurosaurian theropods is circumstantial and debated. Here we report an exceptionally preserved skeleton of a juvenile megalosauroid, Sciurumimus albersdoerferi n… 

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