Excavating Edo’s cemeteries: Graves as indicators of status and class

@article{Tanigawa1992ExcavatingEC,
  title={Excavating Edo’s cemeteries: Graves as indicators of status and class},
  author={Akio Tanigawa},
  journal={Japanese Journal of Religious Studies},
  year={1992},
  volume={19}
}
  • Akio Tanigawa
  • Published 1 May 1992
  • History
  • Japanese Journal of Religious Studies
A large quantity of human bones were discovered on a construction site in Yokodera-cho, Shinjuku-ku about seven years ago. In the course of the ensuing excavation, in which I was a participant, it was discovered that during the Edo period this site was the location of a temple called Hosen-ji g7%3, and the bones unearthed were those that had been buried in the temple graveyard. As we dug further, a large ceramic jar burial (kamka~z) containing human bones was discovered at a depth of about 1-2… 

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