Examining the Scientific Consensus on Climate Change

@article{Doran2009ExaminingTS,
  title={Examining the Scientific Consensus on Climate Change},
  author={Peter T. Doran and Maggie Kendall Zimmerman},
  journal={Eos, Transactions American Geophysical Union},
  year={2009},
  volume={90},
  pages={22-23}
}
  • P. DoranM. Zimmerman
  • Published 20 January 2009
  • Environmental Science
  • Eos, Transactions American Geophysical Union
Fifty-two percent of Americans think most climate scientists agree that the Earth has been warming in recent years, and 47% think climate scientists agree (i.e., that there is a scientific consensus) that human activities are a major cause of that warming, according to recent polling (see http://www.pollingreport.com/enviro.htm). However, attempts to quantify the scientific consensus on anthropogenic warming have met with criticism. For instance, Oreskes [2004] reviewed 928 abstracts from peer… 

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