Examining the Impacts of Residential Self‐Selection on Travel Behaviour: A Focus on Empirical Findings

@article{Cao2009ExaminingTI,
  title={Examining the Impacts of Residential Self‐Selection on Travel Behaviour: A Focus on Empirical Findings},
  author={Xinyu Cao and Patricia L. Mokhtarian and Susan L. Handy},
  journal={Transport Reviews},
  year={2009},
  volume={29},
  pages={359 - 395}
}
Abstract Numerous studies have found that suburban residents drive more and walk less than residents in traditional neighbourhoods. What is less well understood is the extent to which the observed patterns of travel behaviour can be attributed to the residential built environment (BE) itself, as opposed to attitude‐induced residential self‐selection. To date, most studies addressing this self‐selection issue fall into nine methodological categories: direct questioning, statistical control… 

Examining The Impacts of Residential Self-Selection on Travel Behavior: Methodologies and Empirical Findings

TLDR
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Examining The Impacts of Residential Self-Selection on Travel Behavior: Methodologies and Empirical Findings

TLDR
This report reviews and evaluates alternative approaches to attitudinal self-selection in suburban residents and recommends usage of longitudinal structural equations modeling with control groups, a design which is strong with respect to all causality requisites.

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