Examining attention and cognitive processing in participants with self-reported mild anomia

@article{HuntingPompon2011ExaminingAA,
  title={Examining attention and cognitive processing in participants with self-reported mild anomia},
  author={Rebecca Hunting-Pompon and Diane L. Kendall and Anna Bacon Moore},
  journal={Aphasiology},
  year={2011},
  volume={25},
  pages={800 - 812}
}
Background: People who report mild anomia following stroke often score near or within normal limits on traditional assessments of language. Based on evidence of cognitive influences on linguistic production in people with aphasia, this study examined non-linguistic, cognitive function and its potential influence on word retrieval in individuals with mild anomia. Aims: This study explored the following research questions: Do people with mild anomia have impaired performance on tasks which… Expand
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