Examining Menstrual Tracking to Inform the Design of Personal Informatics Tools

@article{Epstein2017ExaminingMT,
  title={Examining Menstrual Tracking to Inform the Design of Personal Informatics Tools},
  author={Daniel A. Epstein and Nicole B. Lee and Jennifer H. Kang and Elena Agapie and Jessica Schroeder and Laura R. Pina and James Fogarty and Julie A. Kientz and Sean A Munson},
  journal={Proceedings of the SIGCHI conference on human factors in computing systems . CHI Conference},
  year={2017},
  volume={2017},
  pages={6876 - 6888}
}
We consider why and how women track their menstrual cycles, examining their experiences to uncover design opportunities and extend the field's understanding of personal informatics tools. [] Key Result Our findings encourage expanding the field's conceptions of personal informatics.

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