Ex situ conservation genetics: a review of molecular studies on the genetic consequences of captive breeding programmes for endangered animal species

@article{Witzenberger2011ExSC,
  title={Ex situ conservation genetics: a review of molecular studies on the genetic consequences of captive breeding programmes for endangered animal species},
  author={Kathrin A. Witzenberger and Axel Hochkirch},
  journal={Biodiversity and Conservation},
  year={2011},
  volume={20},
  pages={1843-1861}
}
Captive breeding has become an important tool in species conservation programmes. Current management strategies for ex situ populations are based on theoretical models, which have mainly been tested in model species or assessed using studbook data. During recent years an increasing number of molecular genetic studies have been published on captive populations of several endangered species. However, a comprehensive analysis of these studies is still outstanding. Here, we present a review of the… 
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Supplementing the studbook. Using genetic analysis to complement a captive breeding programme of an endangered primate, Hylobates moloch.
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Genetic variation is both high and shows no deviation from wild-born to captive-born at neutral microsatellite loci, care should be taken to maintain rare mtDNA haplotypes and MHC DRB alleles in future generations.
Assessing evolutionary processes over time in a conservation breeding program: a combined approach using molecular data, simulations and pedigree analysis
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The results are consistent with gene flow through managed breeding in captivity minimising inbreeding over time, and serve as an example of how conservation managers can assess the impact of evolutionary processes on managed populations and adapt management practices if required.
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