Evolving Notions of Schizophrenia as a Developmental Neurocognitive Disorder

@article{Seidman2017EvolvingNO,
  title={Evolving Notions of Schizophrenia as a Developmental Neurocognitive Disorder},
  author={Larry J. Seidman and Allan F. Mirsky},
  journal={Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society},
  year={2017},
  volume={23},
  pages={881 - 892}
}
  • L. Seidman, A. Mirsky
  • Published 1 October 2017
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society
Abstract We review the changing conceptions of schizophrenia over the past 50 years as it became understood as a disorder of brain function and structure in which neurocognitive dysfunction was identified at different illness phases. The centrality of neurocognition has been recognized, especially because neurocognitive deficits are strongly related to social and role functioning in the illness, and as a result neurocognitive measures are used routinely in clinical assessment of individuals… 
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